Anabolism : Training Effect & Infant Growth



https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5828430/
. 2018; 15: 10.
How much protein can the body use in a single meal for muscle-building? Implications for daily protein distribution

Abstract

Controversy exists about the maximum amount of protein that can be utilized for lean tissue-building purposes in a single meal for those involved in regimented resistance training. It has been proposed that muscle protein synthesis is maximized in young adults with an intake of ~ 20–25 g of a high-quality protein; anything above this amount is believed to be oxidized for energy or transaminated to form urea and other organic acids. However, these findings are specific to the provision of fast-digesting proteins without the addition of other macronutrients. Consumption of slower-acting protein sources, particularly when consumed in combination with other macronutrients, would delay absorption and thus conceivably enhance the utilization of the constituent amino acids. The purpose of this paper was twofold: 1) to objectively review the literature in an effort to determine an upper anabolic threshold for per-meal protein intake; 2) draw relevant conclusions based on the current data so as to elucidate guidelines for per-meal daily protein distribution to optimize lean tissue accretion. Both acute and long-term studies on the topic were evaluated and their findings placed into context with respect to per-meal utilization of protein and the associated implications to distribution of protein feedings across the course of a day. The preponderance of data indicate that while consumption of higher protein doses (> 20 g) results in greater AA oxidation, this is not the fate for all the additional ingested AAs as some are utilized for tissue-building purposes. Based on the current evidence, we conclude that to maximize anabolism one should consume protein at a target intake of 0.4 g/kg/meal across a minimum of four meals in order to reach a minimum of 1.6 g/kg/day. Using the upper daily intake of 2.2 g/kg/day reported in the literature spread out over the same four meals would necessitate a maximum of 0.55 g/kg/meal.


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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11701431
2001 Dec;281(6):E1172-81.
Testosterone dose-response relationships in healthy young men.

Bhasin S
1, Woodhouse L, Casaburi R, Singh AB, Bhasin D, Berman N, Chen X, Yarasheski KE, Magliano L, Dzekov C, Dzekov J, Bross R, Phillips J, Sinha-Hikim I, Shen R, Storer TW.

Abstract

Testosterone increases muscle mass and strength and regulates other physiological processes, but we do not know whether testosterone effects are dose dependent and whether dose requirements for maintaining various androgen-dependent processes are similar. To determine the effects of graded doses of testosterone on body composition, muscle size, strength, power, sexual and cognitive functions, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), plasma lipids, hemoglobin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels, 61 eugonadal men, 18-35 yr, were randomized to one of five groups to receive monthly injections of a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist, to suppress endogenous testosterone secretion, and weekly injections of 25, 50, 125, 300, or 600 mg of testosterone enanthate for 20 wk. Energy and protein intakes were standardized. The administration of the GnRH agonist plus graded doses of testosterone resulted in mean nadir testosterone concentrations of 253, 306, 542, 1,345, and 2,370 ng/dl at the 25-, 50-, 125-, 300-, and 600-mg doses, respectively. Fat-free mass increased dose dependently in men receiving 125, 300, or 600 mg of testosterone weekly (change +3.4, 5.2, and 7.9 kg, respectively). The changes in fat-free mass were highly dependent on testosterone dose (P = 0.0001) and correlated with log testosterone concentrations (r = 0.73, P = 0.0001). Changes in leg press strength, leg power, thigh and quadriceps muscle volumes, hemoglobin, and IGF-I were positively correlated with testosterone concentrations, whereas changes in fat mass and plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were negatively correlated. Sexual function, visual-spatial cognition and mood, and PSA levels did not change significantly at any dose. We conclude that changes in circulating testosterone concentrations, induced by GnRH agonist and testosterone administration, are associated with testosterone dose- and concentration-dependent changes in fat-free mass, muscle size, strength and power, fat mass, hemoglobin, HDL cholesterol, and IGF-I levels, in conformity with a single linear dose-response relationship. However, different androgen-dependent processes have different testosterone dose-response relationships.

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Babies are born with around 10-12% bodyfat.
By 6 mths that rises to 25-30%.
Makes sense on the basis an energy reserve and insulation is built after exiting the womb.
This would help explain why breast milk has a high energy content

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5761669/





baby weight gain

average birth weight  7lbs = 3.2kg
av wt gain in 4 mths  200g/week
4-6mths 160g/week
6-12 mths 65g/week

4mths  3.5kg gain total 6.7kg   110% gain
6mths   1.4kg gain total 8kg    150% gain
12mths  1.7kg gain total 9.7kg  200% gain

https://kellymom.com/bf/normal/weight-gain-metric/quotes WHO stats


breast milk composition  /100mls
energy 280 kj  67 Cals
protein 1.3g  5.2Cals   7%
carbs  7.0g   28Cals  42%
fat 4.2g   38Cals 51%

http://www.infantnutritioncouncil.com/resources/breastmilk-information/

Calf  average birth weight 40kg
average mating weight at 12mths 330kg
= 8x birth weight.

https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/animal-industries/dairy/improving-your-herd/age-and-live-weight

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